Kansas Criminal Lawyer

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If you have been charged with a crime in the state of Kansas – whether or not you are guilty of that crime – it is important to hire a qualified Kansas criminal attorney, or defense attorney, as soon as possible after your arrest. Your criminal defense attorney can help you at every step of the process, from questioning and booking, to the arraignment and pretrial hearing, to the plea deal or trial, to the sentencing and appeals.

The definition of a crime is as any act or behavior which violates a law or regulation prohibiting it. A crime can also be the failure to perform an act which is required, such as failing to pay taxes. There are some common law crimes, but most crimes in the United States are established by local, state, and federal governments. There are two broad categories of crimes, felonies and misdemeanors. Felonies are the more serious of the two, and felonies includes such offenses as arson, treason, burglary, aggravated assault and/or battery, rape, homicide, tax evasion, forgery, fraud and grand theft. Misdemeanors are crimes such as simple assault and/or battery, disorderly conduct, driving while under the influence, prostitution, trespassing, jaywalking and vandalism.

Any person charged with a criminal offense carries a tremendous burden. Facing arrest and a possible jail sentence is difficult, but the assistance of a criminal lawyer can make this burden easier to bear. If you have been charged with a crime, seek a qualified Kansas criminal lawyer attorney to guide you through the complicated legal system and ensure you receive a fair trial.

A criminal defense lawyer will protect the best interests of a client facing criminal charges, whether or not the case goes to trial. A skilled criminal lawyer must be well-versed in the criminal laws of Kansas and be able to defend the accused using the various tools such as evidence and proper investigation of witnesses.

The prime duty of the defense counsel is to defend the client irrespective of his or her innocence or guilt, and even the legal system acknowledges this, by placing the burden of proof with the prosecution. This means that it is the State\'s duty, not the defense\'s, to prove that the crime was committed by the accused and to do so beyond a reasonable doubt. All the defense must do it plant adequate doubt in the minds of the jury.

A case, however, may not even go to trial. A skilled criminal lawyer can raise the possibility of seeking a plea bargain, in which the accused must fulfill some requirement, such as a mandatory rehabilitation program, in order to receive lesser charges or a reduced sentence.

In the event the case does go to trial, and a sentence is handed down, the accused can also raise a plea in an appellate court. A defense lawyer will be well versed in the justice system to proficiently guide the defendant in all the legal matters. It is important to understand that the actual case is never between the victim or the complainant and the accused, but is between the defendant and the state. Therefore it is the duty of the state prosecutor to prove beyond any reasonable doubt the guilt of the accused in order to issue a sentence equivalent to the crime charged.

The state, with its access to the required resources, therefore employs experts to assist in proving the guilt of the accused. The criminal lawyer must endeavor to represent a client as expertly as possible to gain the benefit of any remedy that the legal system permits and provide a skillful defense as long as it is within the limitations of the law. An attorney's duty to protect the client's best interests at all costs is authorized by the legal system and acknowledged as necessary as long as the lawyer does not perform a fraud on the court in doing so.

Hiring a lawyer who is trustworthy as well as knowledgeable will ensure that there is a just outcome if the case goes to trial. If you\'ve been arrested for a crime in the state of Kansas, whether or not you are guilty, you need to contact a qualified Kansas criminal attorney as soon as possible.

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