Philadelphia Jury Awards $5.05 Million Greyhound Bus Passengers after Safety Negligence leads to Auto Accident

On July 22, 2016, a grand jury in Philadelphia awarded $5.05 million to four passengers of the Greyhound Bus Carrier after an auto accident that occurred back in 2013. While driving on interstate 80, the bus driver fell asleep behind the wheel and the bus crashed directly with a tractor-trailer. The jury found the driver, Sabrina Anderson, and Greyhound itself, fully responsible for the accident.
After the trial, which lasted six weeks, the four passengers were given direct bounties totaling $3.05 million as compensation and also a total of $2 million for punitive damages, which ultimately were granted to punish Greyhound for endangering the lives of its passengers.
In the end, the court decided Anderson was at fault for 55 percent of the accident and Greyhound at fault for 45 percent. The driver’s negligence and also Greyhound Bus Lines, Inc.’s outrages actions lead to the court granting the punitive compensation, in hope that new regulations are placed to prevent future accidents.
According to the official statement by Lead Council Jon Ostroff, “Greyhound must update and enforce its driver safety rules and fatigue management policies or these preventable, catastrophic, fatigue-related crashes will continue.”
Ostroff also announced, based on the testimony given by CEO David Leach, that the company Greyhound is more interested in making profit than in securing the safety of its passengers. He additionally called out for the government to intervene. He stressed that new regulations and policies are needed in order to minimize and prevent fatigue related crashes.
The Safety Management Director at Greyhound, Alan Smith, testified and said that the company failed to introduce any modifications to the company’s fatigue-management program. This safety program has not been upgraded since 2006, which was shocking seeing as both CEO Leach and Safety Director Smith did not even work for the company at the time.
This statement ignited a fire that could not be ignored and guided the jury to the conclusion that Greyhound was not only being negligent but also irresponsible.
There are still 12 other passengers that are expecting trial, among them is the Estate of Son Thih Than Hoang, who died in the crash after being ejected from him seat.

On July 22, 2016, a grand jury in Philadelphia awarded $5.05 million to four passengers of the Greyhound Bus Carrier after an auto accident that occurred back in 2013. While driving on interstate 80, the bus driver fell asleep behind the wheel and the bus crashed directly with a tractor-trailer. The jury found the driver, Sabrina Anderson, and Greyhound itself, fully responsible for the accident.

After the trial, which lasted six weeks, the four passengers were given direct bounties totaling $3.05 million as compensation and also a total of $2 million for punitive damages, which ultimately were granted to punish Greyhound for endangering the lives of its passengers.

In the end, the court decided Anderson was at fault for 55 percent of the accident and Greyhound at fault for 45 percent. The driver’s negligence and also Greyhound Bus Lines, Inc.’s outrages actions lead to the court granting the punitive compensation, in hope that new regulations are placed to prevent future accidents.

According to the official statement by Lead Council Jon Ostroff, “Greyhound must update and enforce its driver safety rules and fatigue management policies or these preventable, catastrophic, fatigue-related crashes will continue.”

Ostroff also announced, based on the testimony given by CEO David Leach, that the company Greyhound is more interested in making profit than in securing the safety of its passengers. He additionally called out for the government to intervene. He stressed that new regulations and policies are needed in order to minimize and prevent fatigue related crashes.

The Safety Management Director at Greyhound, Alan Smith, testified and said that the company failed to introduce any modifications to the company’s fatigue-management program. This safety program has not been upgraded since 2006, which was shocking seeing as both CEO Leach and Safety Director Smith did not even work for the company at the time.

This statement ignited a fire that could not be ignored and guided the jury to the conclusion that Greyhound was not only being negligent but also irresponsible.

There are still 12 other passengers that are expecting trial, among them is the Estate of Son Thih Than Hoang, who died in the crash after being ejected from him seat.

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