Michigan Workers Compensation Lawyer

Call (888) 966-9241 to speak with a workers compensation attorney.

In Michigan, workers\' compensation is compulsory. It is the employer's responsibility to provide the employee or the employee's family with medical and disability benefits due to a job-related injury, occupational disease, or death.

In the state of Michigan, all public employers are required to secure workers\' compensation insurance. Private employers are not required to have coverage if they do not employ at least three employees at one time. A private employer must have coverage if they employed one worker or more in the previous year for at least 35 hours each week for at least 13 weeks.

Mediated settlements are accepted in the state of Michigan. Mediated settlements are typically used to resolve workers\' compensation disputes in which medical benefits are solely needed, the employee has already returned to work, or when an attorney is not representing the employee.

In the state of Michigan, workers\' compensation insurance coverage may be provided through a private insurance company or through a state fund. Also, some employers choose to be self-insured. Initially, the employer is given the choice of physician. After a set period of time defined by state law, the employee is allowed to choose a medical provider.

For temporary total disability (TTD), permanent total disability (PTD), and permanent partial disability (PPD), payments are a percentage of the employee's weekly wages. Payments may last as long as the employee is disabled. In certain circumstances, TTD payments cannot exceed a set weekly maximum amount, and cannot be less than a set weekly minimum amount. The employee may receive awards along with their TTD benefits so long as they are eligible for workers\' compensation in the state of Michigan. Awards cannot be subject to reduction due to TTD benefits received by the employee. Unemployment insurance as well as social security may alter TTD benefits in certain situations.

In the state of Michigan, an employee can receive mental and physical rehabilitation benefits. In certain circumstances, aural rehabilitation benefits are available for the employee.

You may be entitled to a settlement for a partial permanent disability award if you have permanent work restrictions imposed because of your work injury or job related injuries. Medical evidence will determine the extent of your temporary as well as permanent disabilities. The value of your claim depends, in large part, on the extent of permanent disability. Your Michigan Workers Comp Lawyer will be able to answer the hard injury and disability settlement questions for you, and counsel you on:

a stipulation and award;
a compromise and release;
lifetime medical care options;
Michigan benefits for temporary disability, permanent disability, partial permanent disability, and 100% disability;
Michigan vocational rehabilitation (vocational rehab) Michigan job re-training

If the employee dies as a result of his or her injury, death benefits are given to the employee's spouse or the spouse and his or her children. Death benefits are a percentage of the employee's wages. The spouse and children shall receive at least a minimum benefit, regardless of the employee's past earnings. Compensation for funeral expenses is available.

Attorney\'s fees may be limited to 30 percent by statute in some circumstances.

If you or someone you know has been injured at work, and you want to learn more about your legal rights, contact a workers\' compensation lawyer or attorney today. You can find a workers\' compensation lawyer by visiting the American Bar Association website. The American Bar Association website features a lawyer locator function which allows the user to search through workers\' compensation lawyer and attorney profiles in each specific city and state. Access to the site and profiles is absolutely free.

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