Oklahoma DWI / DUI Lawyer

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In 2006, 26 percent of all traffic accident fatalities across the nation involved a driver with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher. In Oklahoma, and the rest of the United States, driving with a BAC of .08 or higher is illegal. Many people don\'t realize that after only two drinks, your BAC can reach levels for illegal driving, and therefore you can be arrested for breaking the law. If you have recently been arrested for a DUI or DWI offense, it is imperative that you consult an Oklahoma DWI/DUI lawyer. Whether you feel you have been wrongly accused of DUI or DWI, or you know that there are mitigating circumstances the court should be aware of, finding an Oklahoma DUI/DWI lawyer is the first step you need to take.

Oklahoma Laws
Unlike in other states, having a blood alcohol content of less than .08% does not let you off the hook in Oklahoma. You can still face impaired driving charges, especially if you are under 21. For those who are under 21, a zero tolerance law is in effect in every state; a BAC of only .02 can get you arrested.

If your blood alcohol content is found to be higher than .15%, you will face more severe consequences such as longer jail sentences, higher fines, and the possibility of mandatory alcohol treatment. In Oklahoma, a first-time offense is considered a misdemeanor, but still carries serious consequences. Any subsequent DUI arrests after the first one are considered felonies and carry even heavier penalties.

For a misdemeanor DUI charge, you may spend anywhere from 10 days to one year in jail. You may also be required to pay heavy fines and will most likely lose your license for a period of time. If you refuse to undergo chemical testing at the time of your arrest, you can automatically lose your license for up to three years. A felony charge carries a jail time of one to five years for the first offense, and one to seven years for further charges. Felony charges have fines, probation, and court costs as well. As you can see, DUI and DWI convictions are not taken lightly. They are serious crimes, and the consequences are meant to deter them from happening in the first place.

It is important to keep in mind that once you are charged and found guilty, this crime could affect you for the rest of your life. You should expect higher fines for even the smallest traffic infractions, because you have a criminal record. Also, you may face employment, insurance and credit difficulties once you have a criminal record, as your conviction will appear on any paperwork or other records they may require.

What to Do
The first thing you need to do is find a lawyer. When you are looking for a lawyer to represent you in your DUI charges, there are three primary things you need to consider. First, look at the firm's background with regard to cases like yours. How many have they tried? What is their success rate? How well do they know their way around the system? Second, look carefully at the firm's expertise with regard to DUI and DWI cases. Make sure your attorney is familiar with DUI laws and procedures on an intimate level. Finally, be sure that you understand your attorney's fee schedule. Ask about retainer fees, and find out what the hourly billing rate will be. Ask about payment plans to help you manage your debt.

The Next Step
Aside from these questions about the firm and the lawyers, you will also need to take note of what actually happened to you during your DUI incident, how it happened, why you think it happened, and the events that led to it happening. Relating everything to your Oklahoma DUI/DWI lawyer will improve your chances of either being cleared of the charges or having a less severe sentence. Contacting a qualified Okalahoma DWI/DUI attorney can seriously improve your chances of fighting back. Do not get caught in despair, contact a lawyer or attorney today.

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